Having issues with molehills appearing in your lawn? If you have a dog, they will definitely have sniffed them out (and possibly dug furiously at them if you have a terrier). Though it’s unlikely that you’ll see the culprits responsible for this unsightly disturbance, they will definitely make their presence known and, as worrying as that might be, it’s important to remember that moles are not all bad.

Indy sniffing out the molehill

Moles dig a series of tunnels below the surface which can have the unfortunate side effect of causing rutting and unevenness in your lawn. However, rather than eating roots or plants, they are carnivores, eating anything they come across in their tunnels. This can be a good thing when they are eating the larvae of pests such as leatherjackets, but it is less fortunate if they come across worms. The good news is, if you’re seeing mole hills, it means your soil is fantastic! Moles love aerated and well-watered soil with plenty of delicious creatures to eat. In fact, moles can add to the aeration of the soil, meaning it won’t get too compacted, and any water will drain away nicely. Unfortunately, they can disturb the roots of plants, such as grass and cause a not-so-even surface.

The best thing to do is to work within the biodiversity of your garden. In this instance it is important to clear the molehills before mowing – and before your dog can dig them up, damaging your lawn further. The contents of molehills are rich in nutrients and work fantastically as top soil or as a potting compost – so use it in your borders and pots.

If the problem is too much for your lawn, the safest thing to do is get a sonic probe (or more than one if it’s for a larger area). These can be placed into the earth and emit a vibration that deters moles, encouraging them to move to a different area. Another possible, but more expensive option is installing a robotic mower – the vibrations from these little machines are said to have a similar effect.